Debbie Ridpath Ohi reads, writes and illustrates for young people. Every few weeks, she shares new art, writing and resources; subscribe below. Browse the archives here.

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Back to I'M BORED Classroom Activities 

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POTATO-FOCUSED ACTIVITIES

Also see Boring Facts About Potatoes.

READING & WRITING:

Have books about potatoes, vegetables, gardening, farming, available in class.

Read some information about potatoes and then a) write a paragraph about potatoes or b) Answer a question sheet about potatoes. 

Related book suggestions:

Potatoes, Potatoes - by Anita Lobel. K-Gr. 3. First published in 1967, this picture book introduces two brothers who are lured by the trappings of glory to become the commanders of opposing armies. 

The Enormous Potato - written by Aubrey Davis, illustrated by Dusan Petricic. PreSchool-Grade 1. Retelling of Tolstoy's The Great Big Enormous Turnip, but using a potato instead.

Pigs Love Potatoes - written by Anika Denise, illustrated by Christopher Denise. Counting book for ages 4+.

Potato Joe - by Keith Baker. Preschool-Grade 1. Counting book.

SCIENCE:

Draw a cross-section science diagram of a potato growing in the ground. Put a title and label your diagram (roots, fruit, eyes, ground, etc.). Color in your picture.

Here are some tips on how to grow your own potatoes, from the Ontario Potato Board website.

Another idea: grow the potatoes in a school garden, harvest them, then send them to the local Food Bank.

ART:

 

Potato Prints: Have an adult cut a potato in half and with a plastic knife carve a letter or design into your potato half. Dip your potato print in paint and press prints on paper.

If you have access to cookie cutters, here is a print-ready PDF of How To Create A Potato Stamp.

COOKING:

Kid-Friendly Potato Cooking Tips and Recipes from the Ontario Potato Board

How Potato Chips Are Made (Ontario Potato Board)

Potato Goodness Unearthed (see cooking section, also includes kid-friendly activity pages)

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FOR TEACHERS:

Classes are welcome to write a letter to the illustrator. Details here.

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Thanks to Allison Durno for help with these activity pages.